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Reveling in a rainy garden

We'e been so starved for rain these past five or six years, I was starting to forget what it was like.

The past two months, we've had a series of nice, durable, gentle rains.  Heavy enough to soak but not to wash out. Frequent enough to foster growth, but not so frequent as to drown the seedlings. For us farmers, it's like having a self-gardening plot: we just have to go out every week or so and ooh and ahh over how fast everything is getting big.

Of all the gardens we've ever planted, I think this one has been the most rewarding.  The conditions -- timing, moisture, sun and season -- have come together perfectly.  We have plenty of mulch down so the weeds aren't even raising their heads.

We grew cabbage one summer (probably not the best season for that) and it seemed to take forever to see anything cabbage like. It's too early to see any embryonic cauliflowers, but the transformation from one week to the next is dramatic.

The lettuce is growing so well that we're able to harvest it for the dinner table!

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