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Our first cauliflower of the season

We have purple and gold cauliflower blossoming in our garden this week. (We got the color pack when we planted in November.)

Nearly a week of sunshine has made everything grow big. Besides the cauliflower, the lettuces are thriving along with the spinach.  The brussels sprout plants keep getting larger and larger -- keeping pace with the cauliflower plants -- but there's no signs of sprout stems.

The red Swiss chard is coming along.  It's still small and slow, but seems healthy.

There's not much work to be done at this point. Mother Nature has kept a nice pace of rain so there's no watering to be done. The break in the rain and the arrival of sun means that weeds are starting to thrive, but not so much that we can't easily keep them under control.  There are bug holes in the lower leaves of our lettuces, but not so severe that we're inclined to break out the organic bug spray.

The basil plants are no longer thriving.  We've had temperatures in the low 30s, so that probably hasn't done much for them, but they had exceeded their season by several months at this point.


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